Reducing the Risk of Twins in Horses

Whilst the thought of a mare giving birth to twins may sound heart-warming, the reality is far from it, with only the occasional mare giving birth to two healthy foals. With this in mind, it is usual for vets to scan the mare 14 to 16 days after ovulation to identify whether she is pregnant with twins. Here Ed Lyall BvetMed CertEM MRCVS of the Sussex Equine Hospital explains the process used for identifying twins and what can be done if a mare is found to be carrying a twin pregnancy. Read more

Foaling the Mare

Mare and Foal
Your mare has safely carried her special package for 11 months, but as her due date approaches it can be a worrying time. What to look out for and how will you know if things aren’t going right are amongst the familiar questions asked by breeders. Here Ed Lyall Vet Med Cert EM (StudMed) MRCVS
of the Sussex Equine Hospital shares his advice from what to look out for during the final month of pregnancy to the birth of the foal. Read more

A Tour of the Sussex Equine Hospital

In summer 2017 the Sussex Equine Hospital moved from its original home in Arundel
(formerly known as the Arundel Equine Hospital) to a purpose-built site in Ashington, near Pulborough. Fiona Rafferty went along to tour the impressive facilities.

The Sussex Equine Hospital was founded in 1951 and since that time has grown to a team of 55 including 20 specialist equine vets, veterinary nurses, grooms, laboratory technicians, pharmacy dispensers and a whole team of administrative staff who help with the smooth running of the busy hospital. Read more

A Research Grant Awarded for Research into Control of the Equine Tapeworm.

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A Research Grant Awarded for Research into Control of the Equine Tapeworm.

The Royal Veterinary College and Austin Davis Biologics Ltd, providers of EquiSal Tapeworm testing, have been awarded a research grant by Petplan Charitable Trust for a project entitled: “Improved control of the equine tapeworm, Anoplocephala, through new insights into the biology of the oribatid mite intermediate host.”

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Guidelines on Keeping Horses Hydrated When Travelling By Road

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Guidelines Launched to Safeguard Horses against Dehydration when Travelling

 A vital resource for anyone involved in transporting horses by road

A collaboration of industry bodies, veterinary organisations and welfare groups coordinated by World Horse Welfare has produced clear and practical guidelines on keeping horses hydrated when travelling by road.

Developed following extensive research and consultation by the group which includes; World Horse Welfare, FVE, FEEVA, the Animal Transportation Association, Animals’ Angels and The Donkey Sanctuary, the guidelines set out simple recommendations to safeguard against dehydration and ensure horses arrive at their destination healthy and comfortable.

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Horse Owners Needed for Vaccine Trial

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Horse Owners Needed for Ground-Breaking Equine Grass Sickness Vaccine Trial

As the high risk season for Equine Grass Sickness fast approaches the Animal Health Trust, one of the UK’s leading veterinary charities, is urging horse owners to take part in the second year of its ground-breaking nationwide EGS vaccine trial.

A debilitating and often fatal disease affecting horses, ponies and donkeys, Equine Grass Sickness (EGS) occurs predominantly in Europe, with Britain experiencing the highest incidence worldwide. In 2014, 59 cases of EGS were reported through the EGS Surveillance Scheme, but it is likely that this represents only a fraction of cases occurring annually throughout Britain.

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UK to Introduce Central Equine in Wake of Horse Meat Scandal

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UK to Introduce Central Equine Database after Endorsement of Tougher EU Laws in Wake of Horse Meat Scandal

The UK is to establish a much needed new central equine database as part of a more robust – and enforceable – equine identification (horse passport) system after EU member states endorsed proposals for stronger regulations after flaws were laid bare in last year’s horse meat scandal.

 

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Equine Vets have the highest injury risk of all Civilian Professions

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Being a horse vet in the UK appears to carry the highest risk of injury of any civilian occupation in the UK, according to the results of the first ever survey on injuries within the profession. This study, commissioned by the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) and conducted by leading medical professionals at the Institute of Health and Wellbeing and the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Glasgow, has prompted BEVA to raise awareness of these risks within the equine industry and to look at ways of ways of making equine veterinary practice safer.

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